Gap HSIA-801: Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards (e.g. radiation, isolation and confinement, altered gravity), we need to evaluate and identify how HSI can further characterize and/or mitigate additive and/or synergistic effects of the spaceflight environment, for increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing).
Last Published:  07/30/21 01:05:31 PM (Central)
Responsible Element: Human Factors and Behavioral Performance (HFBP)
Status: Open
Description

Spaceflight evidence suggests crew members may experience changes in vigilance and attention on orbit, particularly during periods of reduced sleep (Dinges et al., 2017); crew have also been shown to experience declines in fine motor performance as a result of gravity transitions (Holden et al., 2019). Terrestrial animal studies assessing the effects of radiation exposure on cognition, have further demonstrated effects (Britten et al., 2019). While these studies demonstrate that hazards associated with future exploration missions (e.g. isolation and confinement, prolonged radiation exposure) will pose risk, crews will face these stressors simultaneously. The potential synergistic effects of these stressors, to health and performance, is unknown. 

Exploration crewmembers will rely heavily on information-rich displays for commanding and monitoring vehicles and habitats during autonomous long-duration missions. They will interact with displays using fine motor skills needed for pointing, touching, and actuating hardware and software controls. We do not know the impacts of altered gravity, radiation, and isolation and confinement, on the cognitive functions and fine motor skills required to interact with computer-based systems. 

 

Current standards and guidelines are inadequate to mitigate these factors. Different mission attributes such as altered gravity and mission duration pose unique stressors to the human physical state (e.g., spinal elongation) and its impact to crew performance and vehicle/habitat design is unknown. Efforts are underway to further characterize these effects, independently and concurrently, on health and performance. The intent of this gap is to focus on the translation of that evidence into human-systems integration based recommendations for mitigating risk. 

Target for Closure
  1. Validated human-systems integration recommendations for risk mitigation;
  2. Standards and guidelines for integrating spaceflight-induced changes into habitat and system design
 
Mappings
Risk Risk of Adverse Outcomes Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture
You are here! Gap HSIA-801: Given each crewmember will experience multiple spaceflight hazards (e.g. radiation, isolation and confinement, altered gravity), we need to evaluate and identify how HSI can further characterize and/or mitigate additive and/or synergistic effects of the spaceflight environment, for increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions (including in-mission and at landing).
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Multi-Disciplinary Research Plans

Documentation:
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