Gap HSIA-601: We need to determine individual and team-based Human System Integration (HSI) training procedures, regimens, and standards that are required pre- and in-mission, and post-landing to help reduce demands on crew (e.g., neurocognitive, time); support meaningful work during long-duration missions; and mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g., training retention, problem-solving, procedure execution) during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions.
Last Published:  07/30/20 02:45:13 PM (Central)
Responsible Element: Human Factors and Behavioral Performance (HFBP)
Status: Open
Description

Long duration exploration missions will present new challenges to crew health and performance, including prolonged exposure to radiation and isolation and confinement, and will significantly differ from our current and past spaceflight experience. As missions become further distant from earth, spaceflight crews will become increasingly dependent on on-board systems, elevating the need for an effective on-board system that facilitates crew readiness to respond to demands and anomalies that may arise.  Current plans call for years of training to prepare astronauts for such missions, increasing the risk that not all training will be retained (and/or retrievable).  Additionally, current focus on task-based training may not facilitate the ability to generalize or transfer skills knowledge, increasing the burden in terms of the amount of training which needs to happen, prior to flight.  

 

As we prepare for the future, we need to ensure the optimal methods and tools that encompass the full training continuum for an exploration mission scenario. Complementing pre-flight training with an adaptive, in-flight training regimen (Kelley 1969; Landon O’Keefe 2018), may offer several advantages, including reducing neurocognitive workload burden on the crew and optimizing training content to serve as a means through which to enhance brain functioning and provide meaningful work, particularly en route to Mars. A training regimen that keeps individual crew and team motivated and engaged by maintaining brain areas and motor skills areas honed for readiness during post-landing missions requirements (Fiore, Cuevas & Oser, 2003).

 

An applied and multi-disciplinary approach will be taken towards addressing this gap. Anchoring outcomes to operational performance in context of exploration-specific missions; developing, testing, and validating an adaptive training approach with a focus on the neuroscience of learning and, in particular, in the acquisition and retention of mission-relevant skills; ensuring pre-mission and in-mission training regimens which reduce resource requirement (including cognitive load) on the crew.

Target for Closure
  1. Validated training countermeasures relative to exploration for individuals and crews, that address neurocognitive changes and meaningful work; 
  2. Regimens for implementing training pre- and in-mission to mitigate impacts of the spaceflight environment on operational performance.
 
Mappings
Risk Risk of Adverse Outcome Due to Inadequate Human Systems Integration Architecture
You are here! Gap HSIA-601: We need to determine individual and team-based Human System Integration (HSI) training procedures, regimens, and standards that are required pre- and in-mission, and post-landing to help reduce demands on crew (e.g., neurocognitive, time); support meaningful work during long-duration missions; and mitigate potential decrements in operationally-relevant performance (e.g., training retention, problem-solving, procedure execution) during increasingly earth-independent, future exploration missions.
Active
Completed
Planned-Funded
Planned-Unfunded

Documentation:
No Documentation Available