Gap Sleep-101: Given each crew member will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., Space Radiation, Altered Gravity, Isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew sleep-wake cycles and/or circadian shifting, health and/or CNS/cognitive functioning to identify any identified adverse individual or team crew health, and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes.
Last Published:  03/26/21 03:33:57 PM (Central)
Responsible Element: Human Factors and Behavioral Performance (HFBP)
Status: Open
Description

Sleep is a vital physiological requisite for humans, needed for survival like air, water and food. Sleep loss, disruption of circadian rhythms, and work overload are critical fatigue-causing factors that can compromise safety and lead to increased errors and degraded performance and productivity. Evidence from spaceflight has demonstrated that sleep is generally reduced on orbit relative to sleep experienced by crew during mission training and post-mission as well (Flynn-Evans et al., 2015). Objective evidence from Shuttle and ISS demonstrates that average nightly sleep duration is around six hours; terrestrial studies have shown that chronically sleeping around six hours a night leads to decrements in vigilant attention typically seen after one night’s total sleep deprivation (Van Dogen et al., 2003; Belenky et al., 2004). Estimates of circadian phase on-orbit have also demonstrated that approximately 19% of sleep episodes were misaligned (Flynn-Evans et al., 2015).  The intent of this gap is to characterize the potential moderating and/or mediating effects of sleep and circadian phase relative to other potential stressors (e.g. radiation exposure, altered gravity) and outcomes (e.g. cognitive performance, SANS). While there is a substantial evidence base which supports the intimate tie between sleep health, circadian physiology, and performance, the potential synergistic effects of these and other risk factors has not yet been established. Efforts are needed to further characterize these relationships and define potential impacts to risk mitigation strategies.

Target for Closure
  1. Identification of integrated risk/threats relative to sleep and circadian phase.
  2. Update to countermeasure approach.
Mappings
Risk Risk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload
You are here! Gap Sleep-101: Given each crew member will experience multiple spaceflight hazards simultaneously, we need to identify and characterize the potential additive, antagonistic, or synergistic impacts of multiple stressors (e.g., Space Radiation, Altered Gravity, Isolation, altered immune, altered sleep) on crew sleep-wake cycles and/or circadian shifting, health and/or CNS/cognitive functioning to identify any identified adverse individual or team crew health, and/or operationally-relevant performance outcomes.
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Completed
Planned-Funded

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