Gap DL-301: We do not have an identified, validated and standardized approach for vehicle instrumentation and biodynamic data collection, and predictive analytic biodynamic modeling that would allow for specific risk injury prediction by mission-phase, crew functionality post-landing, and vehicle design.
Last Published:  07/30/21 01:05:31 PM (Central)
Responsible Element: Human Factors and Behavioral Performance (HFBP)
Status: Open
Description

Exploration vehicle design needs to ensure crew safety through landings on the Moon, Mars, and back home on earth. To inform future mission designers, more data are needed to understand the relative contribution of risk factors to injuries observed in current landings returning from the ISS. Impact rates relative to crew positioning and crew health status (i.e. level of deconditioning), are believed to play a part. Due to the complex nature of spacecraft dynamics, and that each spacecraft design may induce different dynamics on the occupant, adequate tools are needed for designers to use to evaluate vehicle designs during development and for verification.

The scope of the possible and probable dynamic conditions expected in spaceflight is broad. Unlike terrestrial vehicles that have predictable impact conditions (i.e. automobiles that travel primarily in two dimensions and impact in predictable ways, or aircraft that have specific impact time histories regardless of the manufacturer), spacecraft are designed to launch, abort and land in a variety of conditions that may induce drastically different loading conditions on the crew. 


Due to the breadth of dynamics that may be experienced, analytical tools are critical for development of spacecraft. Early insight into the risk of injury allows designers to select safer design approaches and minimizes programmatic risk of failing to meet the Occupant Protection requirements. In addition, because of the myriad of possible conditions, analytical tools can be used to down-select cases for physical testing to show compliance with design requirements. Unique to spaceflight, pressure suits and helmets may have a significant effect on the occupant responses, and currently there are no accepted approaches for addressing the suit and helmet analytically. Additionally, human surrogate models (either Anthropomorphic Test Device [ATD] or human numerical models) are not validated for spaceflight conditions. Without adequate validation, the models may not be acceptable for use in design development or requirement verification activities.

A validated approach is needed for data collection and predictive modeling which takes into account crew status (including deconditioning, sex differences), mission duration, and vehicle design parameters. 


Initially, ATD numerical models will be assessed in spaceflight loading conditions to determine the model uncertainty factors associated with each metric. In parallel, modeling techniques will be developed to address the pressure suit and helmet, which will allow analytical assessment of vehicle designs. Finally, the appropriate human surrogate models necessary for any updated Occupant Protection Standards will be validated in spaceflight conditions using validated approaches, sensors, human impact data and data collected from other sources.
Target for Closure
  1. Standardized approach for vehicle instrumentation and biodynamic data collection;
  2. Validated human surrogate models for use in spaceflight applications.
Mappings
Risk Risk of Injury from Dynamic Loads
You are here! Gap DL-301: We do not have an identified, validated and standardized approach for vehicle instrumentation and biodynamic data collection, and predictive analytic biodynamic modeling that would allow for specific risk injury prediction by mission-phase, crew functionality post-landing, and vehicle design.
Active
Completed

Multi-Disciplinary Research Plans

Documentation:
No Documentation Available