Task Advanced Displays for Efficient Training and Operation of Robotic Systems (Robotic Systems-Oman, Completed) (Completed)
Last Published:  07/31/19 10:05:33 AM (Central)
Short Title: Robotic Systems
Responsible HRP Element: Space Human Factors and Habitability
Collaborating Org(s):
National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI)
Other:
Funding Status: Completed - Task completed and produced a deliverable
Procurement Mechanism(s):
Solicited
Aims:

The objective of this project was to develop tools to predict performance and customize Astronaut training programs that account for (1) Astronaut trainees performance; (2) ability learning rate; and (3) level of mastery variability.[ec1]  It was found that: (1) Improved training methods from this research provided a framework for designing future in-flight training procedures during long duration missions; (2) quantitative performance metrics should be built into both the JSC Dynamic Skills Trainer (DST) and the inflight ROBoT laptop trainer used by ISS astronauts for training in orbit; (3) that individual differences in spatial and manual control skills affected performance of critical operational skills, including complex robotics tasks associated with post-Shuttle era ISS operations. Three specific aims related to astronaut performance during space telerobotics training were undertaken:

 

  1. The first aim was to improve NASA teleoperation training efficiency by scientifically customizing remedial training based on the measured spatial abilities of individual astronauts. Also, included as part of this aim was testing of the mental rotation and perspective taking spatial abilities of 40 active astronauts who had completed at least one robotics training course. 
  2. The second aim was to perform experiments using a space telerobotics training simulator at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to quantify how a trainees individual spatial and manual control abilities, use of camera views and hand-controller reference frame impacts learning and final level of performance as both a primary and secondary robotics operator.
  3. The third major aim was to identify and develop new interfaces and tools to support future in-space, lunar surface teleoperation and teleoperation training.

Improved training methods provided a framework for designing future in-flight training procedures during long duration missions; demonstrated how individual differences in spatial and manual control skills affected performance of critical operational skills, including complex robotics tasks, informed the design of telerobotic displays and bimanual control inceptors (control sticks, and established a new method for quantifying neural cross coupling between hands during movement; an area for potential research and clinical applications.

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