Task Testing solid state lighting countermeasures to improve circadian adaptation, sleep, and performance during high fidelity analog and flight studies for the International Space Station
Last Published:  07/31/19 10:05:33 AM (Central)
Short Title: Lighting Effects
Responsible HRP Element: Human Factors and Behavioral Performance
Collaborating Org(s):
Other:
Funding Status: Active - Currently funded and in progress
Procurement Mechanism(s):
Solicited
Aims:
Currently, the fluorescent-based “General Luminaire Assemblies” (GLAs) on the International Space Station (ISS) are reportedly dim and burning out. Crewmembers have complained about the lack of intensity in these lights, and their dim and static nature may be associated with circadian misalignment and sleep loss experienced on orbit.

As a result of a multi-disciplinary effort based out of the Johnson Space Center, in 2010 the ISS Program agreed to fund a new LED-based lighting system, called the Solid State Light Assemblies (SSLAs), for the ISS vehicle. This system will enable crewmembers to quickly adjust brightness and wavelength of the lights so lighting can support crew vision and provide a crew health countermeasure for circadian entrainment, sleep shifting, enhancing alertness and performance. Specifically, crewmembers will be able to toggle between a high intensity light enriched in the “blue” portion of the spectrum for the morning, night time operations and schedule shifting (“Phase Shift”); a crisp daytime light to support visual acuity (“General Vision”); and a low intensity, non-blue enriched light in the evening (“Pre Sleep”).

The requirements for this lighting system were based on the best available scientific evidence, as well as technical constraints of the ISS vehicle (e.g., no wireless configuration)

The purpose of this task is to evaluate on the ISS whether the proposed lighting protocols using the SSLAs on orbit lead to their intent of maintaining circadian alignment and promoting sleep at night and performance during the day, and, as needed, during night time operations.  A preliminary ground analog study in a high-fidelity laboratory analog will precede the flight portion of this investigation.

Findings will be relevant for the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element vehicle and habitat development, and will inform medical protocols for using light as a non-pharmaceutical countermeasure for circadian desynchronization on orbit.

Mappings
RiskRisk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders
You are here!TaskTesting solid state lighting countermeasures to improve circadian adaptation, sleep, and performance during high fidelity analog and flight studies for the International Space Station

RiskRisk of Performance Decrements and Adverse Health Outcomes Resulting from Sleep Loss, Circadian Desynchronization, and Work Overload
You are here!TaskTesting solid state lighting countermeasures to improve circadian adaptation, sleep, and performance during high fidelity analog and flight studies for the International Space Station