Last Published:  07/31/19 10:05:30 AM (Central)
Responsible Element: Human Health Countermeasures (HHC)
Status: Open
Description
Present State of Knowledge:

Limited data are available to definitively establish the individual roles of spaceflight stressors (i.e. exposure to microgravity, radiation, oxidative and mental stress, or lifestyle alterations in diet and exercise) on short-term and long-term cardiovascular health outcomes.  Existing evidence suggest increased vascular stiffness and carotid intimal media thickness immediately post-flight, but it is unclear if these effects persist or resolve over time.  We hypothesize that the cumulative effect of spaceflight stressors might increase long-term cardiovascular disease risk for crewmembers, although the role of the individual risk factors and the scope of these long term effects are insufficiently understood.

Research Approach:  Activities to-date have included retrospective data mining and flight and ground studies to identify the role of the risk factors outlined above. Importantly, many questions regarding these risk factors can only be answered using actual space flight exposure because we hypothesize that it is the “total spaceflight environment” (i.e. accumulation of all risk factors listed) that contributes to long-term cardiovascular disease risk. As such, preflight, in-flight, and postflight crew testing is planned and required to close this gap.

Target for Closure
Establish the impact of spaceflight stressors (i.e. exposure to microgravity, radiation, oxidative and mental stress, or lifestyle alterations in diet and exercise) on sub-clinical and clinical measures of cardiovascular disease. 
Mappings
Risk Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems
You are here! Gap CV8: Can manifestations of sub-clinical or environmentally induced cardiovascular diseases during spaceflight be predicted?
Active
Completed
Planned-Funded
Terminated

Documentation:
No Documentation Available