Last Published:  07/31/19 10:05:30 AM (Central)
Responsible Element: Human Health Countermeasures (HHC)
Status: Open
Description
Initial State of Gap: Sensorimotor disturbances associated with spaceflight can lead to decrements in the ability to acquire information from instrumentation and spatial disorientation leading to performance and safety issues. It is necessary to determine if a crewmember can land and operate a vehicle after long duration spaceflight.  This gap needs to be placed in the context of the expected operating environment of future vehicles.  Design of future vehicles should account for human factors in the cockpit and task design to avoid provocative movements or physically difficult tasks.

Target for Gap Closure: Define the magnitude of change and time course of recovery for sensorimotor function associated with manual control after a spaceflight mission; including gaze control, eye-head-hand coordination and spatial perception. Provide this information to the appropriate personnel to develop advanced displays and controls interface systems and training tools to assist with control of spacecraft and associated systems.

Interim steps:
1.Conduct flight and ground studies to examine manual control before/during/after exposure to varying gravitational and spatial environments.
2.Develop and verify training tools to assist with manual control.
3.Update the evidence report and NASA standards with information defining the acceptable level of sensorimotor risk based on functional performance thresholds below which task performance is impaired.
4.Provide inputs for cockpit design to the Human Integration Design Handbook.
5.Use evidence acquired to address sensorimotor gaps SM24 and SM28.

Approach: Further define potential sensorimotor disturbances that can lead to performance decrements including gaze control, eye-head-hand coordination and spatial perception and provide the information to appropriate personnel to develop advanced displays and controls interface systems and training tools to assist with control of spacecraft and associated systems.
Target for Closure
Define the magnitude of change and time course of recovery for sensorimotor function associated with manual control after a spaceflight mission; including gaze control, eye-head-hand coordination and spatial perception. Provide this information to the appropriate personnel to develop advanced displays and controls interface systems and training tools to assist with control of spacecraft and associated systems.
Mappings
Risk Risk of Impaired Control of Spacecraft/Associated Systems and Decreased Mobility Due to Vestibular/Sensorimotor Alterations Associated with Spaceflight
Risk Risk of Adverse Cognitive or Behavioral Conditions and Psychiatric Disorders
You are here! Gap CBS-SM6.1: Determine if sensorimotor dysfunction during and after long-duration spaceflight affects ability to control spacecraft and associated systems.
Active
Completed
Planned-Funded
Planned-Unfunded

Documentation:
No Documentation Available